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From the College of Natural Sciences
AI Master’s Program Launches at UT Austin With Ability to Serve Thousands

AI Master’s Program Launches at UT Austin With Ability to Serve Thousands

Just as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning emerge as the fastest-growing in-demand skill sets in the global workforce, The University of Texas at Austin is establishing a new online master's program in AI with the potential to bring thousands of new students into the field.

More Charge Acceptors aren’t Necessarily Better for Solar Cells

More Charge Acceptors aren’t Necessarily Better for Solar Cells

Chemists from Rice University and The University of Texas at Austin discovered more isn't always better when it comes to packing charge-acceptor molecules on the surface of semiconducting nanocrystals, such as those in solar cells.

Solar panels. Photo credit: Flickr user zak zak. Used via Creative Commons license CC BY 2.0.
Chemistry Professor Earns Humboldt Award

Chemistry Professor Earns Humboldt Award

Dmitrii Makarov, a professor in the Department of Chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin, has won a Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany.

How Amphibious Plants Rewired a Gas Exchange Pathway to Survive in Water

How Amphibious Plants Rewired a Gas Exchange Pathway to Survive in Water

Just as humans cannot breathe underwater, the tiny pores of plants can't exchange air underwater.

When grown on land, the amphibious plant Rorippa aquatica produces pores called stomata (left); but grown in water, it does not. Credit: Shuka Ikematsu.
Moran to Receive Waksman Award in Microbiology from NAS

Moran to Receive Waksman Award in Microbiology from NAS

Nancy Moran, an evolutionary biologist at The University of Texas at Austin, will receive the 2023 Selman A. Waksman Award in Microbiology from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

McLellan Wins Major Awards from Welch Foundation, National Academy

McLellan Wins Major Awards from Welch Foundation, National Academy

Jason McLellan, a structural biologist at The University of Texas at Austin, is being honored today with the announcement of two highly prestigious awards—the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Award in Molecular Biology and the Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research from the Welch Foundation.

Remembering High-Energy Physicist Roy Schwitters

Remembering High-Energy Physicist Roy Schwitters

Roy Schwitters, a world-renowned experimental high-energy physicist and emeritus professor at The University of Texas at Austin, passed away earlier this month.

Nanoparticles Make it Easier to Turn Light into Solvated Electrons

Nanoparticles Make it Easier to Turn Light into Solvated Electrons

'Green' reducing agents could help tackle climate change and treat contaminated water.

When scientists shine low-intensity near-ultraviolet light on metal nanoparticles, electrons in the nanoparticles oscillate. This oscillation, referred to as a plasmon, can give the electrons enough energy to emit into the surrounding solution. Credit: Rice University.
Cosmic Dawn III Recreates the Early Universe Epoch of Reionization in Unprecedented Detail

Cosmic Dawn III Recreates the Early Universe Epoch of Reionization in Unprecedented Detail

The CoDa III simulation shows galaxies forming in the early universe along the filaments and knots of the “cosmic web.”

The Cosmic Dawn ("CoDa") Project, an international team of astrophysicists, recently reached a new milestone – CoDa III – the first trillion-element simulation of how the universe evolved in its first billion years. This is when galaxies formed and flooded the universe with enough UV starlight to ionize all its atoms and lift the fog that blocked our view. CoDa III is the most detailed and accurate simulation ever produced of this cosmic era, known as the Epoch of Reionization ("EoR"), aligning theoretical and observational data for the first time.

James Webb Telescope Reveals Milky Way-like Galaxies in Young Universe

James Webb Telescope Reveals Milky Way-like Galaxies in Young Universe

New images from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) reveal for the first time galaxies with stellar bars — elongated features of stars stretching from the centers of galaxies into their outer disks — at a time when the universe was a mere 25% of its present age. The finding of so-called barred galaxies, similar to our Milky Way, this early in the universe will require scientists to refine their theories of galaxy evolution.