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From the College of Natural Sciences

When Stars Explode

An image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, of Supernova 1987a, spectropolarimetric data from which was essential to overturning the consensus about the shape of supernovae explosions.When astronomer J. Craig Wheeler first began observing supernovae, there was so little observational data available that scientists were forced to assume a great d...An image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, of Supernova 1987a, spectropolarimetric data from which was essential to overturning the consensus about the shape of supernovae explosions.

Galactic Luminaries to Converge on University of Texas Tuesday

AUSTIN, Texas — More than 130 astronomers from nearly a dozen countries and more than 30 institutions will meet in Austin next week to brainstorm about the evolution of galaxies — those vast cities of billions of stars that are the “bricks” making up the cosmos — and the mysterious “dark matter” that is their largest component. The conference, cal...

Sarah Miller, Rhodes Scholar

Sarah Miller didn’t find out that she was going to be a Rhodes Scholar in the mail, or on the phone. She was standing shoulder to shoulder with the 20 or so other finalists in the Texas/Louisiana region, many of whom she’d gotten to know and like over the course of an intense weekend of interviews. “It was very reality-show style,” says Miller, an...sarah miller

Astrophysics Student Wins Coveted Rhodes Scholarship

AUSTIN, Texas—Sarah Miller, an astronomy and physics major who will graduate in May from The University of Texas at Austin, was recently selected as a Rhodes Scholar for 2008. She is one of 32 students in America to be honored with the scholarship. The Rhodes Scholarship was created in 1902 by British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes to bring outstandi...

Exploring Dark Energy

On a rare cloudy October night in the Davis Mountains of West Texas, University of Texas at Austin astronomers wrangled with what they believe to be the largest mystery of the universe: dark energy.

McDonald Observatory receives $5 million to study dark energy

AUSTIN, Texas — Light might soon be shed on one of the great enigmas of the universe — dark energy — thanks to a $5 million challenge grant from Dallas’ Harold C. Simmons to The University of Texas at Austin. Simmons’ grant will help fund the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) at UT’s McDonald Observatory by matching the next $5...
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