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News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Marine Science Institute Receives $7 Million Grant to Study the Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Marine Science Institute Receives $7 Million Grant to Study the Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

The grant is the largest in the Marine Science Institute's 70-year history.

Giant Claw Helps Fiddler Crabs Stay Cool in More Ways Than One

Giant Claw Helps Fiddler Crabs Stay Cool in More Ways Than One

A male fiddler crab's oversized claw not only looks cool to the ladies, but new research suggests it literally helps crabs to stay cool.

Coral Safe

Coral Safe

Joan Holt would like to see a day when the saltwater fish tanks at your local pet store have a big label slapped on them that says “Coral Safe.”
Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Severely Impairs Reproduction In Atlantic Croaker, Researchers Find

Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Severely Impairs Reproduction In Atlantic Croaker, Researchers Find

Study, the first of its kind looking at fish reproduction across the large hypoxic region off the coast of Louisiana, shows that croaker produce fewer eggs and sperm.
National Science Foundation Grant Helps Preserve and Digitize Fossil Collections

National Science Foundation Grant Helps Preserve and Digitize Fossil Collections

Fragile fossils as old as 55 million years will soon be protected, digitized and made accessible to researchers through $350,000 grant.

At Depth, the Hidden Cost of Oil?

Marine scientist Tracy Villareal on the search for deep water oil plumes in the Gulf of Mexico.

Labs at Sea: Managing Research Miles from Shore

When a piece of equipment breaks in a science lab, it can hold things up for hours. On a research ship 100 miles from port, delays could turn into highly expensive days.

MSI: Sentinels for Climate Change

A video about the climate change related research and education at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas.

Beneath Two Meters of Arctic Ice, Texas Scientists Will Seek Better Understanding of Carbon Cycling and Climate

Beneath Two Meters of Arctic Ice, Texas Scientists Will Seek Better Understanding of Carbon Cycling and Climate

Marine scientists will study coastal ecosystems in the Arctic throughout the year through a $1 million NSF grant.

The Hunt for Oil Plumes

Marine scientist Dr. Tracy Villareal will serve as chief scientist on a research cruise this August into the Gulf of Mexico to study the impacts of the oil spill on phyto- and zooplankton communities and map deepwater oil plumes.

Explore Oil Spill Related Research

Marine Science Institute faculty have years of expertise studying the Gulf of Mexico. Our new "Gulf Science" Web site highlights faculty areas of research related to the oil spill and the Gulf.
Texas Marine Scientist Studies Oil Spill Effects on Oxygen Levels in the Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’

Texas Marine Scientist Studies Oil Spill Effects on Oxygen Levels in the Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’

Marine scientist Zhanfei Liu is studying the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on oxygen levels in the northern Gulf of Mexico in part through a recently received National Science Foundation grant for Rapid Response Research (RAPID).

Amos named 2010 Environmental Hero

Tony Amos, who started rescuing sea turtles off the Texas coast in 1982, was named a NOAA Environmental Hero last week for his role as the founder of the Animal Rehabilitation Keep (ARK) at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) and Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve in Port Aransas, Texas. Amos’s ARK rescues, re...Tony Amos and a Texas terrapin

Marine Science Institute Receives $595,626 to Study Mission-Aransas NERR Nutrients

Goal of project is to describe where and how nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, enter and leave the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) and how nutrients are used and reused in the NERR.

Study: ‘Dead Zone’ Effects on Fish

Study: ‘Dead Zone’ Effects on Fish

Whether a large area of low oxygen water called the “dead zone” in the northern Gulf of Mexico could cause declines in environmentally and economically important fish populations is the subject of a new study by University of Texas at Austin marine scientist Peter Thomas.